Dentist - Naperville
24111 West 103rd Street
Naperville, IL 60564
Call (630) 922-0005
[email protected]



Protocol for ALL upcoming appointments: For the safety of you and others we are limiting patients in the waiting area. Please let us know you have arrived by responding to this text and/or calling our office at 630-922-0005 and we will notify you when we are ready for you to come in. Please wear your mask in to the office and we will indicate when to remove. Temperatures will be checked upon arrival for all patients/guardians. We ask that children over the age of 10 come in alone and family/parent wait in their vehicles. Children 10 and under may be accompanied by 1 parent (anyone else is asked to wait in the vehicles). Following: Governor Pritzker order we also ask that if you have traveled to any of the HOT SPOTS in the last 14 days that you please call our office to get your appointment rescheduled (for everyone safety). Thank You again for your understanding and cooperation.



 

Tall Grass Dental Associates BBB Business Review

 

Online Dental Education Library

Our team of dental specialists and staff strive to improve the overall health of our patients by focusing on preventing, diagnosing and treating conditions associated with your teeth and gums. Please use our dental library to learn more about dental problems and treatments available. If you have questions or need to schedule an appointment, contact us.

If you wince with pain after sipping a hot cup of coffee or chewing a piece of ice, chances are that you suffer from "dentin hypersensitivity," or more commonly, sensitive teeth.

Hot and cold temperature changes cause your teeth to expand and contract. Over time, your teeth can develop microscopic cracks that allow these sensations to seep through to the nerves. Exposed areas of the tooth can cause pain and even affect or change your eating, drinking and breathing habits.

At least 45 million adults in the United States suffer at some time from sensitive teeth.

Sensitive teeth result when the underlying layer of your teeth (the dentin) becomes exposed. This can happen on the chewing surface of the tooth as well as at the gum line. In some cases, sensitive teeth are the result of gum disease, years of unconsciously clenching or grinding your teeth, or improper or too vigorous brushing (if the bristles of your toothbrush are pointing in multiple directions, you're brushing too hard).

Abrasive toothpastes are sometimes the culprit of sensitive teeth. Ingredients found in some whitening toothpastes that lighten and/or remove certain stains from enamel, and sodium pyrophosphate, the key ingredient in tartar-control toothpastes, may increase tooth sensitivity.

In some cases, desensitizing toothpaste, sealants, desensitizing ionization and filling materials including fluoride, and decreasing the intake of acid-containing foods can alleviate some of the pain associated with sensitive teeth.

Sometimes, a sensitive tooth may be confused by a patient for a cavity or abscess that is not yet visible.

In any case, contact your dentist if you notice any change in your teeth's sensitivity to temperature.